Monday, October 07, 2013

TRIAL: International Historical Statistics

We have a trial of International Historical Statistics from Palgrave Macmillan until 8th November 2013.

To access this trial either:

Search International Historical Statistics at http://www.palgraveconnect.com.ezproxy.liv.ac.uk/pc/archives/ihs.html, or

Browse International Historical Statistics at http://www.palgraveconnect.com.ezproxy.liv.ac.uk/pc/doifinder/10.1057/9781137305688

International Historical Statistics is an impressive and peerless collection of statistical data from around the world, covering a wide range of socio-economic topics. The collection includes data on the Americas and Europe, but also hard-to-find data on Africa, Asia and Oceania. It is a truly interdisciplinary product that will prove a valuable resource to those researching and studying Business, Economics, Environmental Studies, Geography, History, Politics, Sociology and Statistical Studies.

This new release updates the last print edition of International Historical Statistics, which was published in 2007 in 3 volumes. It now includes 260 years of rich data, collected between 1750-2010 and available online for the first time. Users will find the ability to conduct statistical analysis across both time and geopolitical boundaries particularly valuable. Data tables can be downloaded as ePDFs and/or Excel files.

After trying International Historical Statistics, please leave your comments below. You can choose the anonymous option to comment without needing to have a Blogger account, but it helps if you include your name in your feedback so that we can follow up on comments.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

This is a familiar publication. Its usefulness is limited by the fact that it draws mainly on published sources; coverage is accordingly patchy and the comparisons one would like to make don't always work because the figures aren't commensurate. The great advantage of the on-line version is that the data can be downloaded as excel files, so the student or researcher can run their own analyses of them. That definitely adds to its usefulness for both research and teaching.