Wednesday, May 15, 2013

TRIAL: Oxford Scholarly Editions Online

We have a trial of Oxford Scholarly Editions Online, from Oxford University Press, until 8th June 2013.

To access this trial go to http://www.oxfordscholarlyeditions.com.

For off-campus access, use AppsAnywhere. If we acquired this resource we would link to it via EZproxy as usual.

Oxford Scholarly Editions Online provides trustworthy, annotated texts of writing worth reading. The launch content includes hundreds of poems, plays, and prose works, written by writers active between 1485 and 1660, including Donne, Marlowe, and Shakespeare.
After trying Oxford Scholarly Editions Online, please leave your comments below. You can choose the anonymous option to comment without needing to have a Blogger account, but it helps if you include your name in your feedback so that we can follow up on comments.

6 comments:

Prof Marcus Walsh said...

Oxford Scholarly Editions Online is an absolutely vital resource, and I hope its purchase can be a priority. Some of the most important scholarship in the field of English literature (and other fields, as represented by e.g. Francis Bacon)appears in the form of scholarly editions. It's essential for us all, from first-year students to advanced scholars, to have access to properly text-edited, and fully annotated editions. These Oxford Editions represent a substantial range of literary periods, genres, and authors, and are almost uniformly edited to the highest academic standards. Without such editions we cannot hope to understand the past. Having these editions available in electronic forms will in itself be a major boon. Please add to the Library's resources.

Alexander Morrison said...

I would second what Professor Walsh says - for instance, any political philosopher or historian of early modern Europe needs access to the works of Thomas Hobbes.

Anonymous said...

Excellent resource - as above, great for students and researchers.
Jon Roberts (English)

E Miskimmin said...

Agreed - a really excellent resource. particulalrly useful for 'Drama 1580-1720'.

Anonymous said...

This would be a very useful resource for us to acquire for many reasons.
Professor John Gowlett (Archaeology)

Anonymous said...

An excellent resource, useful for all kinds of subject areas, but especially our early drama module. Will be used by staff and students if purchased. Sarah Pevereley (English)