Wednesday, October 02, 2013

TRIAL: Slavery and Anti-Slavery, Parts II and III

We have a trial of Slavery and Anti-Slavery, Parts II and III from Gale Cengage Learning until 1st November 2013.

To access this trial go to: http://find.galegroup.com.ezproxy.liv.ac.uk/menu/start?prod=SAS&userGroupName=livuni.

Note that we have already purchased Part I: "Debates over Slavery and Abolition". Part II is "The Slave Trade in the Atlantic World", and Part III is "The Institution of Slavery". Part IV will be released later in 2013.

After trying Slavery and Anti-Slavery, Parts II and III, please leave your comments below. Please specify which part you find most useful, so that we can prioritise. Also, please compare this with Slavery, Abolition and Social Justice if you can. You can choose the anonymous option to comment without needing to have a Blogger account, but it helps if you include your name in your feedback so that we can follow up on comments.

8 comments:

Eve Rosenhaft (CLAS) said...

These are a valuable complement to Part I. I particularly welcome the fact that they include more foreign-language material (German!),which enhances the value of the collection for teaching as well as research. In this respect at least the collection is more useful than Slavery and Social Justice; the search engine is better, too.

Anonymous said...

Parts II and III really do help with understanding and widening a search in this topic as the archive we now have access to isn't just limited to debates over slavery and abolition. However, I feel that the 'Slavery and Social Justice' database contained better visual materials which are ideal for primary source analysis. These sites would be invaluble to my dissertation next semester.

Richard Huzzey said...

These are excellent resources which will be invaluable to our extensive undergraduate teaching in this area. They are particularly important now that students undertake UG dissertations linked to special subjects. These resources also enhance the work undertaken by PGT students in the MA International Slavery Studies and our strong record of PGR work in this field. In sum, this should be an essential purchase giving our nationally and internationally leading concentration on research into histories of slavery and abolition.

Anonymous said...

Parts two and three really offer a much wider amount of resources that can often be invaluable to the undergraduate history student studying slavery like myself. The sites are easy enough to navigate around and the trial has already proven extremely useful for just general research for seminars and the like. I agree with one of the previous comments present that both these resources really will be unquestionably vital for me to obtain the greatest variety of works for my dissertation next term.

Anonymous said...

This resource has provided a wealth of material that has already massively benefited me and would be incredibly helpful when the time to write dissertations comes around.

Third Year History Student said...

This resource would be extremely helpful in finding sources for my third year dissertation, along with helping with various essays in 2 slavery modules I am currently studying.

Third Year History UG said...

These resources have proved valuable when undertaking seminar reading and preparation for a research project. I will almost certainly use this resource when writing essays. It provides us with a wealth of different types of resources that make study much easier and more rewarding.

Kate Hodgson said...


These would be a valuable addition to the university's database collection, supplementing the focus of Part I on abolition; and supporting student learning at both undergrad and postgrad levels. I found the Caribbean and Latin American manuscript collections particularly good in parts 2 and 3 (as well as an expected wealth of material focusing on the US). I did think that Slavery & Social Justice has a wider range of UK-focused resources though, especially regionally (including our own Maritime Museum, and collections from Hull). They are complementary in this regard, and both would actually be useful!