Wednesday, March 27, 2013

TRIAL: International Relations module of Oxford Bibliographies Online

We have a trial of the International Relations module of Oxford Bibliographies Online until 30th April 2013.

To access this trial go to:

http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com.ezproxy.liv.ac.uk/browse?module_0=obo-9780199743292

This is a literary guide to the most important and significant sources in International Relations literature. The guides feature a selective list of bibliographic citations supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult. Each topic has a unique editorial commentary to show how the cited sources are interrelated. The citations promote discoverability as they link out to the sources via your library collection or through Google books and more.

After trying the International Relations module of Oxford Bibliographies Online, please leave feedback through the comments section below. You can choose the anonymous option to comment without needing to have a Blogger account, but it helps if you include your name in your feedback so that we can follow up on comments.

4 comments:

William J. Ashworth said...

This is a really useful source for an array of modules in the History Department. The various themes will also provide excellent bibliographies that will be of tremendous use for students producing third year dissertations.
Dr William J. Ashworth
History Department
27/03/13

Dr Jon Hogg said...

A fantastic resource for History students. A wide-ranging resource. Please subscribe! Dr. Jon Hogg, History

Dr Roger H Platt said...

This is a really useful resource that will be valuable for third year and MA students writing dissertations; Ph D students undertaking initial literature surveys: and researchers who want an over-view of fields in which they are not themselves expert. It is well worth subscribing.

Harald Braun said...

This is a useful resource - though quality of entries is uneven. "Human Rights" and "Just War", for instance, lack in scope and historical depths with regard to the literature surveyed and strands of debate presented. More "international relations" than "history" - but that is to be expected, to some degree. This still could be a helpful resource to help start students off on a topic. Overall, I would be happy for the library to purchase this resource. Whether, in an age of declining budgets, the price tag represents "value for money", I cannot say.

HE Braun, History