Monday, January 30, 2017

TRIAL: Digital National Security Archive (DNSA)

University of Liverpool staff and students have trial access to the Digital National Security Archive (DNSA) until 31st March 2017.  Take a look at this resources, and let us know what you think.

Access: Digital National Security Archive (DNSA)
(Login required off campus)

From the nongovernmental National Security Archive, this resource consists of declassified government documents covering U.S. policy toward critical world events – including their military, intelligence, diplomatic and human rights dimensions – from 1945 to the present. Each collection is assembled by foreign policy experts and features chronologies, glossaries, bibliographies, and scholarly overviews to provide unparalleled access to the defining international issues of our time.

Find our more about the DNSA collections on the Proquest DNSA LibGuide

After trying DNSA, please leave your comments below. You can choose the anonymous option to comment without needing to have a Blogger account, but it helps if you include your name in your feedback so that we can follow up on comments. Do get in touch, we really want to know what you think about this resource.

25 comments:

Dr Andrew Redden said...

This is a fantastic resource and a really important one to maintain Liverpool's position as one of the best UK universities for provision of digital resources (adding diplomatic and US foreign policy materials to the wide range of online newspapers we already have access to). It is of key importance to both teaching (undergraduate and post-graduate) and research (post graduate and staff). It will enable students to engage directly with English Language primary source documentation in areas such as Cold War history, Latin American-US relations, human rights, global foreign policy and will complement undergraduate modules on these topics while also vastly improving the range of sources that dissertation students will have access to. For my part, having access to this resource will mean that I and my postgraduate students will have no need to visit the archive in person for our specific research projects--instead we can access the materials from our own campus.

John McEvoy said...

As a member of Liverpool Alumni and a prospective post-grad student (History), this resource has already been hugely helpful and would continue to be vital with regards to later research. Moreover, the archive itself is really helpfully organised and makes primary source research incredibly accessible. The inclusion of this within the library's electronic databases would be an important addition to databases already available and should further encourage prospective students to choose Liverpool. Thanks!

Emily McIndoe said...

This is a brilliant resource! It has allowed me to greatly expand the scope of my BA (history) dissertation, to include more primary sources and has shed light on issues I would not previously have come across. It will also be essential for potential postgrad research. Definitely a key part of my undergraduate course!

Victoria Shea said...

This resource is proving to be immensely useful in my degree and as a prospective post-grad student would continue to be useful in my later research. The archive has an impressive selection of primary sources that are well organized and easy to find and is an excellent addition to the University's resources. If this archive had been available earlier in my degree I would have definitely utilized it.

Dr Marieke Riethof said...

The National Security Archive will be an excellent resource for teaching and research at the University of Liverpool. I regularly use material from this period in my own research and teaching so having access to this archive would take this to a new level and would allow my students to engage directly with primary sources on the Cold War, US foreign policy and Latin American politics. The archive will therefore be essential for hundreds of undergraduate and postgraduate students in history, politics, languages and Latin American Studies. Given growing scholarly interest in the Cold War, particularly its global dimensions, acquiring the National Security Archive will allow the University to attract postgraduate research students to study in Liverpool. Similarly, my own research will benefit strongly from having access to this archive, which is easy to use compared to the significantly more limited resources available elsewhere.

Mike Yeates said...

This resources has been valuable in a number of ways for me as a final year undergraduate student. I was able to use the sources relating to Argentina in order to further enhance my knowledge on the subject and to back up arguments in a recent project for a History module. I have also been able to utilize this highly 'user friendly' (its layout makes finding the correct period very easy and saves a lot of time) tool to research the Democratic process in Peru which I am studying for a Politics module this semester. A resource such as this can only benefit the students and I would like others to have the same opportunity that I have had with regard to having access to these documents.

Mark Newton said...

This is a great resource. It provides a productive insight into American foreign policy and has primary sources which would be otherwise tough to find. The resource's contents are useful for a wide variety of topics such as Politics and History. The resource covers a wide variety of issues including Central American civil wars and the War on Terror making it good for a wide variety of students' work. This resource is especially useful for students with less experience of using archives because of the easy-to-use nature of it.

Imogen Stone said...

This resource is essential for my third year dissertation (undergraduate) - the documents from these archives have helped to shape the direction of my project and this is where I have so far found the majority of the primary sources I'll be using in the dissertation. I'm not sure I would have been able to find enough primary documents without this resource. I've also been considering postgraduate study and access to these archives would be vital, and would undoubtedly influence my decision on doing further study.

Ben Mordey said...

As a History Masters student I would like to state how useful this resource is. There are numerous undergraduate modules and dissertation topics to which this is hugely relevant. Indeed both my special project and dissertation would have significantly benefited from access to this resource. Particularly with my dissertation it was very difficult to find relevant documents, many of which are easily accessible through this archive. I believe my grades could have been helped by having access to such archives, thus many future students would equally benefit if Liverpool were to have permanent membership. Thank you.

Erika Drummond said...

This is such an incredible resource! As a PhD student, I’m really pleased to have access to digital material which will help me carry out some much needed historical research into U.S policy towards Latin America in the cold war era. As the bulk of my postgraduate research will be ethnographic, and carried out in small rural Guatemalan communities, I simply don’t have the time to carry out extensive archival research off campus. Up until now, this has been a source of anxiety for me, but with this resource being made available to us here at Liverpool, it is possible to access some invaluable primary source documents before travelling to Guatemala to begin my field work. This will really sharpen my understanding of the key historical and political events that have impacted the communities of interest to my investigation. I’m sure I speak on behalf of many other students here at Liverpool who will be delighted to have access to these materials.

Catríona Campbell said...

As a final year Law student studying the Khmer Rouge, this resource has proved to be very useful. I think a large numbers of those studying law, as well as history, would benefit from having access to the National Security Archive. It can be difficult to find primary sources when carrying out research, but this database is laid out very clearly.

Richard Smith - Liverpool/History said...

As a PGR researching into 1980s Chilean politics and history, this archive is an incredible primary source. It would be fantastic to have permanent access to it. It is very well organised and easy to search and download documents and citations. In a short, simple search, I have unearthed several documents rich in information and background that are extremely relevant to my PhD project.

Pablo Bradbury said...

This has been an excellent resource for my doctoral research on revolutionary Christians in Argentina during the 1960s and 1970s. For anyone looking at Argentina in this period, in fact, this database is indispensable. As Latin Americanists are well aware, documentation on Latin America can for so many reasons often be lacking - in Argentina, for example, many documents were destroyed during the last dictatorship, be it by the state or by opposition groups trying to avoid persecution. As such, US intelligence is extremely important for filling in the gaps in knowledge and bringing out the political complexities. To give only one example - the Kissinger conversations help to piece together a clearer understanding of his and the US' role in international affairs that does not suffer from lack of concrete evidence nor resort to myths and generalisations. But the value of this database goes far beyond US international relations, as it offers vital primary sources that relate to resistance movements, human rights, religion, political violence and a whole range of other issues. A vital resource!

Michael Hopkins said...

This is a superb resource of value to a wide range of scholars, covering as it does so many parts of the world, regions not so well-served by other printed and online resources. It also addressed many important issues like nuclear weapons. It will be of great value to my second year students taking my modules on US foreign policy in the twentieth century (there were 88 students registered for this module). It will be an invaluable place to find primary materials for my undergraduate dissertation students (usually about 12 students each year); and my MA students (I usually supervise 4-5 MA dissertations each year). It also opens up the prospect of attracting PhD students to undertake projects utilising these materials. Finally, it contains much of value for my own research projects. I have just finished a book on Dean Acheson and have found in this rich database a valuable document that was hidden from view in the paper archive

Anonymous said...

As a third year History student, working on my dissertation, this resource has proved very useful. The substantial number of primary sources and their accessible nature is hugely beneficial, and would make a valuable addition to library resources.

Unknown said...

What an incredible resource to have! It has literally already been an absolutely amazing help to my dissertation, and who knows how many others can benefit from it in the future if the library decides to keep it.

Paul Tuck said...

What an incredible resource to have! It has already had a tremendous effect on the strength of some of my dissertation research. Hope they decide to keep it!

tom brown said...

This is really great and was really useful for researching my dissertation. Please renew.

Anonymous said...

As a final year undergraduate currently writing a dissertation focused (to put it broadly) on a contemporary account of CIA activity in Nicaragua, this recourse is proving incredibly useful. With a wide range of sources and declassified documents, many focused specifically on my topic and the CIA, this offers me a substantial amount of material I would ordinarily have no access to. As all primary sources I require are U.S. documents, I don't have the option to visit the USA to access archives firsthand as with many of my peers who were able to travel to the British Library and other locations for primary sources, and having access to the National Security archives supplements this incredibly well.

Ryan Teachen said...

I strongly encourage the library to consider investing in full access to this archive. As a third year History student writing my dissertation on America in Vietnam, this archive holds many vital political sources for my research. I know of other students in a similar position to myself who also use this archive with strong dependance for their research. Even if its usage is low in terms of numbers, I would strongly encourage pursuing full access as it is a database full of sources which carry a high degree of weight. Pretty much any area of American history can use this archive to some degree and it would be negligent on the library's behalf not to pursue it.

Dr. Cheryl Hudson said...

This is a wonderful resource that several of my final-year dissertation students are using to great effect. From looking at reports on Vietnam to examining the history of CIA involvement in Latin America and Europe, there are some very enthusiastic young researchers looking at this material. Amid growing public interest in the CIA and the activities of what has come to be known as the 'deep state,' access to a resource such as this is absolutely imperative for a first-class research university. In a globalised world, any university serious about its internationalisation objectives can't afford not to have access to the information this archive provides.

Richard Smith said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Richard Smith said...

This is a great resource for my research into twentieth century Chilean politics and history. Once cannot truly understand that period without knowledge of the USA's covert interventions. The DNSA contains a wealth of documents pertinent to my studies, and I hope the library continues to make it available.

Dr Marieke Riethof said...

The National Security Archive is an essential resource for staff and students across the University of Liverpool. A considerable proportion of my teaching and research deals with the Cold War period, with a focus on Latin American politics, US-Latin American relations, and US foreign policy. The archive provides Liverpool staff and students with an easily searchable database of primary documents, many of which are not easily available. I encourage my students to use primary resources such as these and having the archive available in Liverpool will undoubtedly attract postgraduate research students working on this area.

David Grealy said...

This is a fantastic resource. As a PGR focusing on the human rights "breakthrough" of the 1970s I found that the archive contained a wealth of pertinent source material. Although I am primarily engaged with the investigation of this phenomenon from a British diplomatic perspective, it is essential that I utilize overseas resources in order to properly contextualize my research. As such, the opportunity to view these US documents online is most certainly a valuable one which, I am sure, will also be of great benefit to students for whom a trans-Atlantic research trip is unfeasible.